Researchers examine how to build shelters in the face of global catastrophe

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Researchers examine how to build shelters in the face of global catastrophe
Researchers challenge the idea that shelters should often be installed in extreme and remote areas (Pixabay)

In a new paper, the two scientists examined how humans can survive in the face of global catastrophes.

Researchers examine how to build shelters in the face of global catastrophe
Researchers challenge the idea that shelters should often be installed in extreme and remote areas (Pixabay)

The article, which exemplified the Covid-19 pandemic, concluded that safe havens to be built in the face of global disasters do not need to be in isolated or exotic places.

In the event of a deadly pandemic or other global catastrophe, proposals to save humanity often call for shelters to be built in isolated areas.

In both research and science fiction, such bunkers are depicted underground, underwater, in space, or on a remote island.

On the other hand, Seth Baum, director of the Global Disaster Risk Institute in the US, and Vanessa Adams of the University of Tasmania emphasize that the concept of shelter is actually an adaptive concept.

The paper, published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Risk Analysis, discusses how both China and Western Australia served as successful havens in the first two years of the pandemic.

“I’ve done research in advance about global disaster shelters, including exotic places like space,” Baum said.

This is a topic that has been of interest to me for some time.

“The biggest outstanding example was China,” the researcher said.

It is the most populous country in the world and the number of cases is extremely low. China is not isolated, it has borders with a lot of countries. These are populated borders, and yet they’ve managed to keep the virus out.

That’s why Baum said they chose to focus on Western Australia and China in the analysis.

The two researchers pointed out that despite China’s crowded population, it was able to limit its case numbers to about 1358 per 100,000 people from March 2020 to January 2022.

In the U.S., the number was 98,556, and in India it was 142,365.

Meanwhile, in Western Australia, cases hovered around 48.8 per 100,000 people.

“China is a very clear example at this point,” Baum said.

It was successful despite having the longest land border in the world.

The article examined both the differences and similarities between China and Western Australia.

According to the researchers, these two “pandemic shelters” were successful for different reasons. While China implemented a “zero Covid” policy with strict quarantine measures, Western Australia benefited from its remote location and again from strict measures.

Both countries are conducive to centralization, the article said.

The researchers said that through China’s authoritarian rule, Western Australia was able to achieve social isolation with its strong economy provided by the thriving mining industry.

In addition, both China and Western Australia have maintained trade with outside countries throughout the pandemic.

“That’s encouraging,” Baum said.

Because it shows that shelters can provide a high degree of economic support for outgoing populations during pandemics, an important element for achieving global goals and the continuity of civilization.

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